Presented by President Hugo Chávez as an instrument to make shopping for groceries easier, the “Good Life Card'” is making various segments of the population wary because they see it as a furtive attempt to introduce a rationing card similar to the one in Cuba.

The measure could easily become a mechanism to control the population, according to civil society groups.

“We see that in short-term this could become a rationing card probably similar to the one used in Cuba,” Roberto León Parilli, president of the National Association of Users and Consumers, told El Nuevo Herald. “It would use more advanced technological means [than those used in Cuba], but when they tell you where to buy and what the limits of what you can buy are, they are conditioning your purchases.”

Chávez said Tuesday that the card could be used to buy groceries at the government chain of markets and supplies.

Here. This came about because the Chavez government interfered with too many economic transactions. The process of wealth creation broke down, and buyers and sellers of all kinds of goods and services have to contend with government dictates instead of their own self-interest.

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