“Collectively, the 30 women in the three groups included teachers, managers, dental assistants, child care providers, stay-at-home moms, clerks, accountants, truckers, health care workers and secretaries. Several had moved back in with a parent, and several had lost jobs or homes.”

The words tumbled out: “Downhill.” “Recession.” “Depressing.” “Backwards.” “Unfortunate.” “Sad.” “Loss of control.”
. . .
“The education system, the jobs and the economy … all of it is collectively getting worse,”
. . .
“feel like this is the recession that is never ending.”
. . .
“just trying to breathe.”
. . .
“It’s more barbecues, less eating out,”
. . .
When anger surfaced it was aimed at Congress, which they described as disconnected and unwilling to make the compromises that they have to every day. “The things we teach our kids: let’s work together, compromise,”
. . .
big banks, which they said had reaped most of the government’s bailout rewards, with no effect on them as taxpayers and citizens.

“We bail them out and now they won’t loan anything,”
. . .
Congress evoked words like “self-serving,” “boneheads” and “juvenile.” Obama’s name brought a gamut of emotions, from “disappointing” to “trustworthy,” but sympathy was a common theme.

Hmm.  I’ve thought and felt pretty much the same way this past year, even the sympathy for Obama.  But the sympathy evaporated when I realized he helped cause these problems.  Health care could have been fixed so much more easily and inexpensively, for example.  But instead we got a new entitlement program when the country can’t afford the ones that already exist. 

I got a flu shot today, $29.99.  Out of pocket.  From a pharmacy chain.  Why not $9.99?  Is it because the government restricts the drug makers from competing to make it?  Is it because the state or city government controls it?  I had to fill out a form, which the clerk entered into a computer.

Chuck Raasch.

Advertisements