The title seems counterintuitive but read on. Enticing quotes:

Advances in computerisation do not increase the demand for all “skilled” labour. Instead they reduce the demand for routine tasks, including many tasks that we currently perceive as skilled and require significant formal education for a human being to carry out effectively.
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The routine jobs of 20th century manufacturing and services that were so amenable to creating mass employment are increasingly a thing of the past.
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As Autour et al note, routine human tasks have gradually been replaced by machinery and technology since atleast the advent of the Industrial Revolution. What has changed in the last twenty years with the advent of computerisation is that the sphere of human activities that can be replaced by technology has broadened significantly.
. . .
Hans Moravec identified that it is much easier to engineer apparently complex computational
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To say that our educational system needs to focus on “creativity” is not to claim that we all need to become artists and scientists. Creativity here is defined as simply the ability to explore effectively rather than follow a algorithmic routine, a role that many of our current methods of “teaching” are not set up to achieve.
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This does not mean that full employment is impossible, simply that any job that is routine enough to employ a large number of people doing a very similar role is likely to be automated sooner or later.

Any job that is rules-based can be automated, not just by sophisticated AI (Artificial Intelligence) systems but by relatively simpler computer systems where rules can be identified.

Here.

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