Comments from Tea Party activists on the puny budget deal.

“The government is wasting tax dollars on things that should not be paid for by the general public,” says Diane Canney, a 48-year-old stay-at-home mother who is also a co-founder of the Valley Forge Patriots. “For me as a Catholic who does not believe in abortions, to take my taxes and fund Planned Parenthood, that is not fair,” she says.

I’d imagine its highly immoral to you to have your tax dollars spent on abortion.

“He is saying there is no space between him and the tea party, yet on the second hand they are saying they are going to compromise,” said Robert Kilmarx, director of the Tennessee Tea Party. If Republicans fall short, “come next election, we’ll definitely take a close look at who stayed with their campaign commitments,” he said.

Good, a man with a long memory. Keep’em to their commitments, Robert. But, I will say, that compromise is part and parcel of group decisions.

Gene Clem, a director for the Michigan Tea Party Alliance, a coalition of some 30 tea-party groups in the southwestern part of the state, says members are “pretty happy” because “we got quite a few cuts and we made the point that we have to change our way of thinking and that the deficit just can’t go on.”

That’s true as all hell, the deficit can’t go on. I await the politicians next act.

“I’m really disappointed, but I know [Mr. Boehner] is in a difficult situation,” said retiree Betty Dunkel, the 75-year-old co-founder of the Valley Forge Patriots, a tea-party group outside Philadelphia. “I don’t like it, but at this point, let’s just get something done, let’s get on with it and then work very, very hard on 2012 budget—and we also have the debt ceiling to deal with.”

Disappointed? Me too, but welcome to politics, Betty. As I wrote before, compromise comes with group decisions.  We need more cuts.

Here.

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