Education


Mary Anastasia O’Grady in the WSJ on Trump’s bashing of trade with Mexico:

Exhibit A is his promise to shred the North American Free Trade Agreement (Nafta) on the grounds that Mexico, his favorite bête noire, is stealing American jobs. It is technology, not free trade, that is behind the shrinking number of U.S. manufacturing jobs.

Beating Nafta like a piñata worked in the Republican primary. But it is likely to hurt Mr. Trump and GOP candidates further down the ticket in the general election. Mexico is, after all, the U.S.’s third-largest trading partner and second-largest export market.

. . .

Indiana, the home of GOP vice-presidential candidate Gov. Mike Pence, exported some $4.8 billion of goods to Mexico in 2015, making it the state’s second-largest export market.

. . .

Exports to Mexico were over $1 billion in 31 states in 2015. It’s the largest export market for California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. It ranks second for 25 other states.

. . .

Trade wars will also damage U.S. competitiveness. As former Mexican deputy trade minister Luis de la Calle explained in a conference call to investors in New York earlier this month, Carrier Corp.’s production move to Mexico from Indiana—much-assailed by Mr. Trump—means that the company can survive Asian competition and can retain U.S. jobs in research, development, marketing and high-end components.

. . .

Mr. Irwin cites a study by the Center for Business and Economic Research at Ball State University, which “found that productivity growth accounted for more than 85 percent of the job loss in manufacturing between 2000 and 2010, a period when employment in that sector fell by 5.6 million.” This 85% compares, according to the study, with 13% of job losses attributed to trade during the same period.

. . .

It is “high-education” and “low-education” jobs—requiring “interpersonal interaction, flexibility, adaptability and problem solving”—that are most difficult to automate Mr. Autor notes. Traditional middle-education jobs have been the easiest to replace with technology.

Whoops, the unintended consequences. This same problem goes for Hillary Clinton and any other critic of trade.

I wondered what “competitiveness” meant. The above quote contains an example.

Not a neat situation that lends itself to a government program.

Behind firewall here.

Here’s the entrepreneurial column.

While our two companies run very differently, we have come together to support what we believe is the only set of ideas that stand a chance of turning things around—ideas that can pass political muster in an otherwise very deeply divided Congress. These ideas center on reinvigorating what up to recently has been the most reliable source of job growth and innovation in our economy—the formation of new firms.

Right now, health care and grade-school education are so government-controlled they are wasting resources.

Steve Goldstein is spot on:

The much-maligned government plan did stabilize the financial system, even if taxpayers are still on the hook for up to $130 billion in losses, but private-sector bailouts are better for the public at large.

It’s how it should be: if a private-sector bank is under capitalized, it should find a private investor to provide it with additional cushion, at a hefty price if necessary. And that’s what happened Thursday, just a day after Buffett dreamed up the idea in his bath tub, if CNBC’s account is correct.

Here. The investment adds to the firm’s capital.

That’s the headline of the New York Post headline. “slashes”? A bit overstated I’d say.

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration revealed plans yesterday to cut or roll back hundreds of federal regulations, saying it hoped to save businesses $10 billion and spur job growth.

Here. $10 billion in a $14 trillion economy is 7 hundredths of 1 percent – .07. We need more, a lot more.

Tired of talk radio, screaming political debates, pundits who get tingles up and down their leg? Try EconTalk with Russ Roberts. Sober, current, applicable.

“One thing government can do is partner with the private sector to make sure that every worker has the necessary skills for the jobs they’re applying for,” Mr. Obama said. He pointed to a program announced Wednesday for 500,000 community-college students to get a manufacturing credential approved by the National Association of Manufacturers.

Here.

What a novel idea. Why didn’t the 43 previous presidents and previous Congresses think of that? What we need is less involvement from government, not more. Lower taxes and fewer regulations is a start but we need to go further.

Employees — skilled, semi-skilled, and unskilled — and employers — small, medium, and large — must be able to find each other and come to an agreement on terms. People who want to work should identify what they are good at, what they like, and how they can add value to a prospective employer’s firm. Both need to use jobs boards such as Dice, Monster, Linked, company websites big and small. Check with friends and family. Go to parties and network.

RALEIGH — Freshman Republican lawmaker Mike Stone says his daughter was “used against” him when a public school teacher instructed her and her classmates to contact elected officials in opposition to budget cuts.

The result: a hand-written note imploring Stone to “put the buget (sic) higher dad” so that her school wouldn’t have to forgo field trips, be unprepared for end-of-grade tests, and lay off teachers.

“The truth of the matter is, they baited my daughter on what to write,” said Stone, who represents Lee County in the North Carolina House. “It was totally inappropriate for an 8-year old to be used as a lobbyist in Raleigh.”

This is all to common, and more parents should know about this. Here.

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